Archives for category: Exhibited works

This work was short-listed in the Togart 09 Contemporary Art Award.

This small scale cardboard sculpture depicts one of my most treasured experiences.

This memory combines nostalgia, a love of the emptiness of Australia and an easy, sisterly companionship.

It also involves my car.

My car, a 1964 Ford Falcon XM sedan, is a dream of chrome and stream-lining but it is old and it is slow.

In 2000, in an episode of defiance, against good sense, distance and physics, my sister and I drove this car across Australia and back to surprise our mum for her 50th birthday. As kids our family would regularly make the trek up and down the Stuart Highway. These early trips were about speed and getting to our destination. We were car bound for 15 hours a day; meals were prepacked and toilet stops timed to coincide with refuelling. My sister and I were well trained in efficient road travel.

My car was not.

The old engine and small radiator meant we motored at a gentle 50 mile /hr and, every 3 – 4 hours, the car needed to cool down. So, a couple of times a day, with a thermos of coffee and a couple of camping chairs, we waited. In the vast, red, empty space we waited like grand dames of the interior. With the bonnet popped, on the side of the road we were characters in our own Merchant Ivory production.

With a different car, the mood might have been ‘Mad Max’ or ‘Vanishing Point’ or there may have been no need to stop in the middle of nowhere at all.

Some of these photos are by Erica Lauthier.

For Togart 09 catalogues click here

I have an old 1964 ford falcon XM which I love.

I don’t drive it much because it is heavy and slow and never quite recovered from being driven from Melbourne to Darwin (via Adelaide twice and the Eyre Peninsula) and back again.

For a long time I have wanted to model it in cardboard.

Metcard reliefs.

Exhibited in the Tag Tree Exhibition Group show, Hampshire, UK, 2009.

This exhibition aimed to amass 1000 tags from across the world and  the call for entries was posted through flickr.  The works were to be exhibited in two shows: an indoor, gallery show Hampshire, UK, and an outdoor exhibition to be held in a tree.

Had to have a few tree hanging prectices before sending them off.

For images of the indoor exhibiton see the photos in flickr. I do not think they have been stuck in a tree yet.

Exhibited at in a group show at Artholes, Melbourne, 2007.

Another similar mobile was included in the CERES charity art auction, 2007: http://www.ceres.org.au/

I have made a number of these fish mobiles. The first ones (including this one) are made out of tram tickets / metcards. The fish are suspended on salvaged street-sweeper blades found on the side of the street.

If you look along the edge of most major city streets you will find these long thin snapped of steel blades. Took us a long while to work out that they are from street-sweepers. Once you notice them it is hard to stop seeing them.

I have also made some elephant mobiles but I do not have any photos of these.

Exhibited in the Human Rights Art Award, Darwin, 2006.

I have knitted a lot of woolen ‘quadrapods’ for friends’ kids. They started life as a horse type creature but ended up as a uncategorised 4-legged thing. The main criteria was for it to have many limbs to be carried by or to put in one’s mouth.

This piece is knitted from plastic bags and bits of flyscreen. The texture is similar to the effect you find along some fences where plastic shopping bags have accrewed and matted into a thick. lumpy, faded fabric.

This piece (made up of 3 tiles) was made in response, in part, to the City of Melbourne’s public toilet archive and, in part, to old drafting stencils of produced by caroma for use in architectural drawings. The 3 tiles, when read on their side as scrabble pieces spell P SS…

This is a photo of the work 95% complete. All of the traps were painted blue so that the letters were more apparent.

It was exhibited in 2005 as a part of a show at the City gallery in the Melbourne Town Hall that I curated in conjunction with Dr Andrew Brown-May and Nicky Adams.  The show was called Flush: the quest for Melbourne’s best public toilets in Art, Architecture and History.

The gallery has some kooky exhibitons showcasing the City of Melbourne’s archive material. Recently they have had a ‘pardon me boys’ show on the influx of american service men during WW II.

They are currently working on a webpage of previous shows. I’ll try and add the link when it is on-line.

Exhibited in the ‘Skipping Girl Exhibition’ Group show at the London Tavern, Melbourne, 2004.

This show responded to Richmond’s iconic ‘audrey’ the skipping girl vinegar neon sign. She has recently been restored and is now skipping on Victoria St, Burnley opposite IKEA.